Category Archives: psg

PSG

We’ve only a single day left for the Pagan Spirit Festival.  Last night was Pan’s Ball, an alcohol-fueled party that lasts into the wee hours of the morning.  There are outrageous costumes, big bonfires, lethal punch, and lots of people.  I babysat for the World’s Most Amazing Baby, name of Odin (love it!), and got there after most people were well lubricated by whatever concoction the party bar tenders put together.  Everyone was happy, and I haven’t heard of any bad behavior.  Not surprising, since it’s PSG and bad behavior is pretty much unknown.  It’s the only place I know where you can lose a wallet containing a couple hundred dollars and get it back with nothing missing.  Awesome!

While it’s been wonderful seeing Tina and the extended family, the campground seems to be missing anything related to mystical feeling of past festivals and the workshops have been kind of lackluster.  There have, however, been a couple that were very worthwhile.  “Women and The God,” while I didn’t think it really related to deity, did end up with a wonderful inter-generational discussion of feminist philosophy and self-identification.  The discussion began with the often problematic relationship between women and the masculine god.  Many neo-pagan communities are goddess-centric, and the god is often a lesser powerful deity who is, at times, excluded almost entirely.  After awhile, feminism became the central topic, specifically concerning how feminism has changed from one generation to another.  As in most philosophic discussions, no conclusions were presented, but everyone walked away thinking more deeply about the subject.  Kathryn Hinds let the workshop, and was amazing and knowledgeable.  I purchased a copy of her new book, Magic of the Celtic Gods and Goddesses (Carl McColman and Kathryn Hinds,New Page Books)  and she graciously autographed it for me.  I also got the Kindle edition, though, since I really love my Kindle!

Another wonderful workshop was the one on progressive relaxation and guided imagery facilitated by Dan and Dawn Baldwin.  I was a bit skeptical, but I found as the facilitators took us through the relaxation and imagery, I felt completely relaxed and floaty.  I remember wondering if that was what it felt like to be hypnotized.  Definitely something I’m going to look into more.  I also came away with some ideas and techniques for quieting the constant din that is my mind, and some ideas on where to go to find ways to take in a little less of the emotional noise I seem to pick up everywhere I go.  The new agey term for that is shielding, and I think that’s pretty accurate.

I brought my bodhran with me in hope of finding some instruction, and I’ve been fortunate to have Arthur Hinds (Kathryn’s husband) give me a lesson in how to play.  Arthur is with the band Emerald Rose, and is also a solo performer with mad bohdran skills!  He gave me a much needed tutorial on how to hold the beater (lightly but securely), how to hit the drum (from the shoulder and elbow, not the wrist) and a couple basic rhythms.  I go back today to get another lesson.  He says I’m an average student, but that’s good with me.  I’m totally happy learning to play and I needed a real person to help me start.  Some things can be self taught, but others require human interaction.  That’s me, technology goddess, saying that tech isn’t always better!  To hear Arthur and Emerald Rose, check out their CDs.

Today is the last full day, and tomorrow we pack up and go back to mundania.  It’s been a good week, all in all, and a worthwhile break from real life.  I don’t know if I’ll be ready to go back to the rest of the world when we get back, but I have Monday off.  I thought I might need that buffer.

Supply run at 20 weeks and counting…

Well, not exactly.  More like 146 days including travel day.  That can also be rendered as:

  • 12,614,400 seconds
  • 210,240 minutes
  • 3504 hours
  • 20 weeks (rounded down)
  • 4 months, 26 days

In other words, almost right around the corner!  I have to decide what knitting to take, what backup knitting to take, what books (knitting and otherwise) to take…and then there’s the non-essentials like camping supplies, clothing, food, etc.  So much to do and so little time to do it.

Here’s a picture from one of the morning meetings last year from the website:

Not the most representative picture.  I tried to find pictures of firespinning from that gathering but I wasn’t able to.  The one here is of a similar fire circle at the Cornstalk Festiva at PSG’s former home of Wisteria (with added graphics, of course).

The fire circles start at dusk and go until the wee hours of the morning, except on the Solstice.  That night the fire and drums go all night into the sunrise.  It’s magical. 

The new location is Camp Zoe in Missouri.  It’s also a beautiful place, different from Wisteria, and we’re all still getting the magical feel of the place. Last year we camped on the creek.

This picture doesn’t do it justice, but the panorama shots I took last year haven’t been edited yet.  There are a lot of pictures on the web, though.

PSG attracts close to 1000 people, and we call camp together.  It’s primitive camping, but no one feels deprived.  Everyone shares food, supplies, mead (honey wine), etc.  No one has had anything stolen for the three years we’ve been going.  It’s an amazing experience.  And now there are only 145.8 days left..

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3 Days, 14 Hours

Until PSG.  I’m actually getting to go, against so many odds!  Between money and kids and money and dogs and money and work, I really didn’t think we would be going.  But we are.  Me and hubby – alone – with no kids.  First time in 17 years that we have done anything for more than 48 hours sans offspring.  I’m actually getting excited!  Not only that, but my PSG knitting group is making a donation for the auction at the gathering, and I finished my piece.

psg-knitting1.jpg

It’s roughly 10″ by 12″, in Debbie Bliss Cashmerino Aran in a light mossy green – colorway 011 I believe.  The pattern is fern-like with a seed stitch border.  Just short of one skein.  It’s lovely and springy and soft.

Now, on to the serious packing…